Publication Detail

Citation : Kusao I, Shiramizu B, Liang CY, Grove J, Agsalda M, Troelstrup D, Velasco VN, Marshall A, Whitenack N, Shikuma C, Valcour V. (2012)
Cognitive performance related to HIV-1-infected monocytes.
J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 24(1):71-80.
Abstract : The effect that HIV type 1 (HIV) has on neurocognition is a dynamic process whereby peripheral events are likely involved in setting the stage for clinical findings. In spite of antiretroviral therapy (ART), patients continue to be at risk for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which might be related to persistence of inflammation. In a yearly assessment of HIV DNA levels in activated monocytes, increased HIV DNA copies were found in patients with persistent HAND. Furthermore, activated monocytes from patients with high HIV DNA copies secreted more inflammatory cytokines. Since these activated monocytes traffic to the CNS and enter the brain, they may contribute to an inflammatory environment in the CNS that leads to HAND.
URL Link : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22450616
PMID : 22450616
PMCID : PMC3335340
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