Publication Detail

Citation : Pokhrel P, Herzog TA, Muranaka N, Fagan P. (2015)
Young adult e-cigarette users' reasons for liking and not liking e-cigarettes: A qualitative study.
Psychol Health 30(12):1450-69.
Abstract : Young adults' motives for using or not using e-cigarettes appear to be varied and their relative importance in terms of predicting e-cigarette use initiation, dependence, and cigarette/e-cigarette dual use needs to be carefully studied in population-based, empirical studies. The current findings suggest that e-cigarettes may serve social, recreational, and sensory expectancies that are unique relative to cigarettes and not dependent on nicotine. Further, successful use of e-cigarettes in smoking cessation will likely need higher standards of product quality control, better nicotine delivery efficiency and a counselling component that would teach smokers how to manage e-cigarette devices while trying to quit smoking cigarettes.
URL Link : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26074148
PMID : 26074148
PMCID : PMC4657726
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